Best Practices for Responding to a PR Disaster

A filing cabinet. One of the files is labeled "disaster recovery plan."

Photo credit: Shutterstock

When it comes to PR disasters, how you respond can be the deciding factor in whether your company sinks or swims. That’s why it’s important to have a plan put in place should a crisis come your way.

Don’t wait until disaster strikes. Take action now.

You should prepare for a PR disaster for the same reason you prepare for a natural disaster: just in case. Regardless of whether or not you anticipate trouble coming your way, you should have all your steps outlined so you know exactly what to do if the situation occurs.

Respond within 8 hours.

This is an incredibly short time frame, which is exactly why statements need to be crafted ahead of time. There should be two statements: one from the CEO and one from an official spokesperson. For smaller companies, just one statement from the CEO will suffice.

While it’s difficult to craft a statement when the circumstances of the situation are still unknown, you should still have a general outline ready. Specifics can be inserted later and you can always make changes to the document. Basically, the last thing you want is to have no plan, no statement, and no clue what to do next.

Acknowledge the situation.

This doesn’t mean admitting fault. It means that you’re aware that the situation occurred.

Let the public know what you plan to do.

The public wants to know what steps you’re going to take moving forward. This can mean cooperating with law enforcement officials, it can mean launching your own internal investigation, or it could mean offering some type of compensation to your customers. The idea is to show the public that you’re doing everything in your power to make things right.

Follow through on your promises.

Following through on your promises is even more important than letting the public know what your course of action is. If you do not follow through on what you said you would do, the public will view you and your company as being untrustworthy.

There are many other best practices that you should implement in order to further prepare yourself for a PR disaster. This article is intended to be merely a beginner’s guide to the subject matter. For more in-depth tips, check out the following books:

Damage Control: The Essential Lessons of Crisis Management
Masters of Disaster: The Ten Commandments of Damage Control
The Four Stages of Highly Effective Crisis Management: How to Manage the Media in the Digital Age

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About DevonJ140
I am currently an Accounting Director living in New York City. I love reading and learning more about business, finance, tech, and current events.

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