New York Times and CB Insights Name Sandy Miller to Top 100 Venture Capitalists for Second Year

 

A trophy that says, "top 100."

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For the second year in a row, Sandy Miller of Institutional Venture Partners has been named as one of the top 100 venture capitalists in the world, according to The New York Times and CB Insights. The list is determined using data analytics focusing on investments, consistency, and reputation, among other factors. Miller is joined on the list by fellow IVP General Partner Todd Chaffee.

In addition to co-founding Thomas Weisel Partners with Silicon Valley investment banker Thom Weisel, Miller has 35 years of experience in venture capital and technology investment banking. He’s served on more than 25 public, private, and philanthropic boards. In his work he has led investments in companies such as AddThis, Constant Contact, Datalogix, OnDeck, Zynga, and many more. He was also a Managing Director at Montgomery Securities, Merrill Lynch, and DLJ, as well as a strategy consultant at Bain. Since 2006, Miller has been a Managing Director and General Partner at IVP. He ranks at #41 on the list.

Todd Chaffee, also of IVP, has been a Managing Director and General Partner since March of 2000. He has more than 25 years of experience with operating and investment, including investments in Akamai, Ariba, Business Insider, Netflix, Pandora, Yahoo, and many more. Prior to his work with IVP, Chaffee was Executive Vice President of Visa, overseeing Visa’s Advanced Technology, Strategic Planning, Corporate Development, and Equity Investment divisions. He ranks at #97 on the list.

IVP was one of the first venture capital firms on Sand Hill Road in the Silicon Valley. Founded by Reid Dennis in 1980, IVP focuses on financing later stage companies and helping with overall strategy to ensure company health.

This is the second year CB Insights and The New York Times have put together this list using CB Insights’s Investor Mosaic Algorithm. The algorithm uses straight data as well as submissions to determine the best firms and individual professionals in the venture capital market. Determining factors include investor exits, network centrality, illiquid portfolio company value, and recency of performance. Putting it all together, CB Insights and The New York Times are able to come up with a list of the current best-ranking VC professionals.

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Study Finds that 34% of Millennials Watch More Online Videos than TV

Watching TV on Computer

IMG: via Shutterstock

A recent New York Times survey found that 34% of Millennials watch more online videos than they do on an actual TV. That result is a bit shocking, I would think the percentage would be higher. With the lack of jobs out there, a lot of young graduates can’t even afford cable.

Millennials covers the age group of 18 to 34-year-olds. While most generations span about 16 years, I personally think grouping this big age group together doesn’t make a lot of sense. Current 18-year-olds now grew up never knowing a time before cell phones and internet, while those in their mid 20s and 30s clearly remember a time without. Now I will finish my rant and get back to the topic at hand…

The study reported that about one in three Millennials watch less TV than online videos. 50% of those surveyed said they watched online videos at least once per day.

34% of surveyed millennials said they watch mainly online video or no broadcast TV. Only 20% of Generation Xers (Those born in the early 1960s to early 1980s) and 10% of Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) had the same preference for online videos.

The reasons Millennials gave for watching more online video, 49% said that they like how they can watch it instantly and are able to watch several episodes online.

The study showed that 50% of Millennials who said they watch videos online do so once per day, and 89% said they watch weekly.

Where do you prefer to watch videos?

IMG: via Mashable

IMG: via Mashable

Google Stops Asking Impossible Brain Teasers at Interviews

google

IMG: testing / Shutterstock.com

How many windows are on the Empire State Building? How many watermelons could fit in a bus?

These are examples of the weird and impossible brain teasers Google would ask job applicants. Current employees have stated that these questions are no longer asked, and now the HR execs have come forward to explain why they asked these questions in the first place.

“On the hiring side, we found that brainteasers are a complete waste of time,” said Laszlo Bock, Google’s SVP of people operations, in an interview with the New York Times. “They don’t predict anything. They serve primarily to make the interviewer feel smart.” He stated these type of interviews are more to give them a feel of how the candidate deals with situations in the real world.

It was also noted that Google no longer asks for transcripts and GPAs, because they have been found to be a “worthless” metric for hiring. They have even hired some people with no college degree at all.

“The proportion of people without any college education at Google has increased over time as well,” Bock said in the interview. “So we have teams where you have 14 percent of the team made up of people who’ve never gone to college.”

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