Print Media Isn’t Dying

A picture of a typewriter with the words "the end" printed on a piece of paper.

Photo credit: Shutterstock

For a while there, everybody was concerned that print media was going extinct because people were reading newspapers and books online. That’s turning out to be a false alarm though, as several studies have shown that physical books are experiencing a resurge in popularity.

Newspapers, which have been seen as struggling in the digital age, are also doing fine (at least in the United Kingdom, anyway). According to a recent study, print newspapers are more popular than their digital counterparts, with readers spending 89% of their time with print editions and only 4% and 7% with web and mobile versions.

Other studies have shown that in Germany, print newspapers are 38% more likely to be used as a weekly news source than the web, while in the U.K. that number is only 13%. The authors of the British study think that German readers could spend even more time with their print papers. So while not everybody is reading print newspapers, or maybe newspapers at all, those that are seem to prefer print.

What this tells us is that digital technology hasn’t been as “disruptive” as we’d thought (disruptive in this case meaning that it would kill print media). The people lamenting the death of print media have mostly been people who were slow to embrace digital media in the first place. But there’s no reason that print and digital media can’t coexist, since they serve different purposes for different people.

Could print media eventually die out? Sure, but that’s still a ways down the road. In the meantime, it’s here to stay.

What does that mean for publishers, whether that be books, newspapers, magazines, or comics? It means that they need to pay attention to the way readers actually engage. Better than wasting their time trying to find ways to hinder digital media, they should find ways to work with it, or to find audiences that prefer print products they already make. Adaptability, and paying attention to what’s actually happening, is key here.

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Study Shows That People With ADHD Add Value to Business

A clipboard that reads "ADHD." There are several prescription medications and medical devices surrounding it.

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There are numerous traits associated with entrepreneurial success, including risk taking, passion, persistence, and time commitment. But these traits are also associated with something else: ADHD. Most of us are used to hearing ADHD discussed as a problem, making it hard for students or workers to focus. But that’s only because we’re used to discussing ADHD in the context of structured environments that expect the same thing from everyone.

New evidence gathered from an international study found that, “some of the symptoms of ADHD resemble behaviors commonly associated with entrepreneurship—in a positive sense.” Some of the symptoms even had “a decisive impact on the subjects’ decision to go into business and on their entrepreneurial approach.”

These symptoms include impulsiveness, which allowed the study participants to make decisions without getting bogged down by details and concerns. Additionally, their boredom with their jobs often led them to start their own businesses. Hyper-focus allowed them to hone in on a task and really go after it, which contributed as well to their high activity level. But all of these pros could just as easily become cons, such as when impulsiveness makes it difficult to focus on routine tasks like bookkeeping.

It’s worth nothing that not all ADHD participants were successful, and sometimes their businesses failed, but so do a lot of business, regardless of who starts them. What this study does is gives us a new light in which to look at both entrepreneurship and ADHD, which should help us develop better understandings of both.

The markers by which we measure the success of a business might not be telling us everything about what makes a successful business, or who should start one. And by finding these connections to their symptoms, we can take a more positive look at ADHD as something other than a problem. It’s not something that needs to be treated or cured, but something that people need to learn how to make work to their advantage.

Only 1 in 10 Americans Say They Would Wear Google Glasses

google glasses

Img: Giuseppe Costantino via Flickr

Google Glasses are being talked about on all forms of news sites, but who is actually going to wear them? According to a new study conducted by BiTE interactive, only one in ten American smartphone users would wear these glasses regularly. While they may be very beneficial and innovative, no one really wants to walk around wearing them.

Social awkwardness and the device seeming irritating were the top reasons why people said they would not wear them out in public. Even if the glasses lowered in price from their current $1,500 sticker, about 38% of respondents said they still wouldn’t wear them. About 44% of those who stated they would wear the glasses are most excited about being able to take pictures, and 39% were excited to make phone calls.

“Google Glass represents a profound social barrier for the average consumer,” Joseph Farrell, EVP of operations at BiTE interactive, told Mashable. “At best, they see a Glass user as someone who prioritizes information access over a personal connection with others. At worst, they fear social sleights of hand: researching topics, recording video or Googling a person in mid-conversation,” he continued. “Overall, what Glass offers is combination of high social rejection with features the average person simply doesn’t value over their current smartphone.”

To read more about Google’s CEO Larry Page, click here.

Studies Show that Social Media Hurts Friendships…If you Chose to Speak up Online

Social Media

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It’s no question that social media has changed the way we interact, but many people wonder if it is for better or worse. While there are definitely negatives associated with social media, I believe they have benefited my personal friendships. Social media allows me to stay in touch with friends from college and high school by seeing what they are up to throughout the week. I have reconnected with old friends through Facebook, who I now see regularly. I also enjoy seeing updates from people I have lost touch with, and probably would know nothing about their life if it weren’t for Facebook.

“The world has changed and a significant proportion of relationships happen online but manners haven’t caught up with technology,” Joseph Grenny, co-chairman of VitalSmarts told Reuters.

The way social media benefits your friendships all depends on your attitude. If you are throwing your religious or political beliefs in people’s faces, arguing, and being rude to other people, then there may be some real life negatives. VitalSmarts conducted the survey that found that as the use of social media has grown, so has incivility, with 78 percent of the 2,698 people reporting an increase in rudeness online. One in five people have reduced their face-to-face contact with someone they know in real life after a spat online.

“When reading a response to your post and you feel the conversation is getting too emotional for an online exchange, you’re right! Stop. Take it offline. Or better yet, face-to-face,” Grenny said.

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