Most Americans Face Hostile Work Environments, According to Survey

According to a new survey, most Americans face a hostile work environment.

Photo: Shutterstock

A recently released survey from the RAND Corporation, Harvard Medical School, and UCLA revealed some pretty disturbing findings about the current American workplace: many employees are under constant stress, workplaces are often hazardous, and social environments are frequently hostile, especially for women.

The survey was given to about 3,000 workers, and while not all of the information gleaned was negative, much of it does give reason for pause:

  • More than one in four American workers say they have too little time to complete their work. This complaint was most frequent among white-collar workers.
  • More than half do some sort of work outside of their workplace, impacting their ability to spend quality time with their friends and family.
  • More than half of those surveyed reported that they are exposed to unpleasant and even hazardous working conditions, including hostility and threats.
  • About 62 percent of American workers reported their work tasks are typically monotonous and unenjoyable.
  • Only 38 percent reported opportunities to advance within their employment.

It’s not all bad news, though. The survey revealed some positive traits of the modern workplace, too:

  • Four out of five Americans said their jobs met at least one definition of “meaningful” most of the time.
  • Eight out of ten American workers said their job is steady and predictable.
  • The majority of those surveyed said they saw “solving unforeseen problems” and “applying [their] own ideas” as important parts of their work.
  • Many reported a certain degree of autonomy and confidence about their skillset.
  • More than half of the surveyed workers (58 percent) said their boss is supportive, and 56 percent said they have good friends at work.

“There’s a message for employers here,” said the study lead author, Nicole Maestas. “Working conditions really do matter.”

This was the first survey of its kind, focusing on American workers ages 25-71. The RAND Corporation and its partners intend to collect data again next year to compare American and European working conditions.

Advertisements

Study Finds that 34% of Millennials Watch More Online Videos than TV

Watching TV on Computer

IMG: via Shutterstock

A recent New York Times survey found that 34% of Millennials watch more online videos than they do on an actual TV. That result is a bit shocking, I would think the percentage would be higher. With the lack of jobs out there, a lot of young graduates can’t even afford cable.

Millennials covers the age group of 18 to 34-year-olds. While most generations span about 16 years, I personally think grouping this big age group together doesn’t make a lot of sense. Current 18-year-olds now grew up never knowing a time before cell phones and internet, while those in their mid 20s and 30s clearly remember a time without. Now I will finish my rant and get back to the topic at hand…

The study reported that about one in three Millennials watch less TV than online videos. 50% of those surveyed said they watched online videos at least once per day.

34% of surveyed millennials said they watch mainly online video or no broadcast TV. Only 20% of Generation Xers (Those born in the early 1960s to early 1980s) and 10% of Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) had the same preference for online videos.

The reasons Millennials gave for watching more online video, 49% said that they like how they can watch it instantly and are able to watch several episodes online.

The study showed that 50% of Millennials who said they watch videos online do so once per day, and 89% said they watch weekly.

Where do you prefer to watch videos?

IMG: via Mashable

IMG: via Mashable

Only 1 in 10 Americans Say They Would Wear Google Glasses

google glasses

Img: Giuseppe Costantino via Flickr

Google Glasses are being talked about on all forms of news sites, but who is actually going to wear them? According to a new study conducted by BiTE interactive, only one in ten American smartphone users would wear these glasses regularly. While they may be very beneficial and innovative, no one really wants to walk around wearing them.

Social awkwardness and the device seeming irritating were the top reasons why people said they would not wear them out in public. Even if the glasses lowered in price from their current $1,500 sticker, about 38% of respondents said they still wouldn’t wear them. About 44% of those who stated they would wear the glasses are most excited about being able to take pictures, and 39% were excited to make phone calls.

“Google Glass represents a profound social barrier for the average consumer,” Joseph Farrell, EVP of operations at BiTE interactive, told Mashable. “At best, they see a Glass user as someone who prioritizes information access over a personal connection with others. At worst, they fear social sleights of hand: researching topics, recording video or Googling a person in mid-conversation,” he continued. “Overall, what Glass offers is combination of high social rejection with features the average person simply doesn’t value over their current smartphone.”

To read more about Google’s CEO Larry Page, click here.

Studies Show that Social Media Hurts Friendships…If you Chose to Speak up Online

Social Media

IMG: via Shutterstock

It’s no question that social media has changed the way we interact, but many people wonder if it is for better or worse. While there are definitely negatives associated with social media, I believe they have benefited my personal friendships. Social media allows me to stay in touch with friends from college and high school by seeing what they are up to throughout the week. I have reconnected with old friends through Facebook, who I now see regularly. I also enjoy seeing updates from people I have lost touch with, and probably would know nothing about their life if it weren’t for Facebook.

“The world has changed and a significant proportion of relationships happen online but manners haven’t caught up with technology,” Joseph Grenny, co-chairman of VitalSmarts told Reuters.

The way social media benefits your friendships all depends on your attitude. If you are throwing your religious or political beliefs in people’s faces, arguing, and being rude to other people, then there may be some real life negatives. VitalSmarts conducted the survey that found that as the use of social media has grown, so has incivility, with 78 percent of the 2,698 people reporting an increase in rudeness online. One in five people have reduced their face-to-face contact with someone they know in real life after a spat online.

“When reading a response to your post and you feel the conversation is getting too emotional for an online exchange, you’re right! Stop. Take it offline. Or better yet, face-to-face,” Grenny said.

%d bloggers like this: